School Uniforms and Kids Clothing Fashions Introduced For Spring 2018

With spring in full swing, Cookie’s Kids Department Stores Keeps Focus on New School Uniforms and Kids Fashions for Boys and Girls While Specializing in Children and Baby Clothes.

New York, United States - April 7, 2018 /PressCable/ —

School uniforms department store, Cookie’s Kids, has become one of the world’s largest kids department store chains featuring everything from premium school uniforms and kids fashion brands to baby clothing along with accessories for children of all ages, and has also been branded the number one school uniform headquarters in the United States by Crain’s Magazine.

With spring in full swing, the clothing outlet chain is keeping the focus on new fashions for both boys and girls while continuing to specialize in premium uniforms trending this season.

“When we hear the word ‘uniform,’ our minds often go straight to blue or white business shirts, plaid pleated skirts or a classic polo with a logo,” says Al Falack, one of the sons of the original founders of Cookie’s Department Store, Inc. “But as times have changed, so have school clothing protocols, and we always ensure to keep our uniform selections fresh, forward and spot-on. The uniform that, from the first day, looks smart tends to remain smart all year while reflecting the school’s identity; simultaneously, uniforms need to be comfortable and durable while reflecting the values of the institution.

“From skirts for girls and trousers for boys to blazer and tie combos that are bringing the formal uniform back into fashion, Cookie’s has the styles that fit on a plethora of body shapes and that are made from the best possible materials that last.”

According to Cookie’s representatives that study fashion-forward trends in the school uniform market, the classic blazer-and-tie duo is experiencing something of a revival in the school uniform genre, with many secondary schools choosing to make over their styles with ties and color-contrasting blazer trims to compliment the school’s vibe. Moreover, the resurgence of patterned and tartan knits for girls, Cookie’s has found, offers a stylish alternative for both secondary and primary institutions.

Sportswear is also definitely beginning to move with the times, according to Cookie’s reps, with cutting-edge layered garments in technical performance fabrics replacing the plain t-shirts and shorts combo. There’s also greater choices for girls’ uniform pieces with modest leggings and more comfortable skorts to encourage young ladies to feel “more confident in their sports gear.”

In addition to a plethora of high-quality girls clothes, boys clothes and school uniforms, Cookie’s also offers baby clothes and even shoes and accessories.

For more information about Cookie’s Kids school unfiorms and other kids clothing selections, you can visit: https://www.cookieskids.com/school_uniforms.aspx

Contact Info:
Name: Al Falack
Organization: Cookie's Kids
Address: 510 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, NY, New York 11201, United States
Phone: +1-718-710-4577

For more information, please visit http://www.cookieskids.com

Source: PressCable

Release ID: 326474

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