Scientists move Doomsday Clock 30 seconds closer to midnight

From left, Thomas Pickering, co-chair of the International Crisis Group; David Titley, a nationally known expert in the field of climate, the Arctic, and national security and Lawrence Krauss, theoretical physicist, chair of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Board of Sponsors, participate in a news conference the at the National Press Club in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 26, 2017, announcing that the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientist have moved the minute hand of the Doomsday Clock to two and a half minutes to midnight. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
From left, Rachel Bronson, executive director and Publisher of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists; Thomas Pickering, co-chair of the International Crisis Group; David Titley, a nationally known expert in the field of climate, the Arctic, and national security; and Lawrence Krauss, theoretical physicist, chair of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Board of Sponsors, participate in a news conference the at the National Press Club in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 26, 2017, announcing that the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientist have moved the minute hand of the Doomsday Clock to two and a half minutes to midnight. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
From left, Lawrence Krauss, theoretical physicist, chair of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Board of Sponsors; Thomas Pickering, co-chair of the International Crisis Group; and David Titley, a nationally known expert in the field of climate, the Arctic, and national security, unveil the Doomsday Clock during a news conference at the National Press Club in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 26, 2017, announcing that the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientist have moved the minute hand of the Doomsday Clock to two and a half minutes to midnight. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Lawrence Krauss, theoretical physicist, chair of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Board of Sponsors, left, and Thomas Pickering, co-chair of the International Crisis Group, display the Doomsday Clock during a news conference the at the National Press Club in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 26, 2017, announcing that the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientist have moved the minute hand of the Doomsday Clock to two and a half minutes to midnight. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

WASHINGTON — The keepers of the Doomsday Clock have moved the symbolic countdown to potential global catastrophe 30 seconds closer to midnight based on President Donald Trump's comments on nuclear weapons and climate change.

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, in a statement accompanying the move Thursday, cited "wavering public confidence in the democratic institutions required to deal with major world threats." It says "deception campaigns" by Russia to disrupt the U.S. election have made the world more dangerous by bringing "American democracy and Russian intentions into question."

The Doomsday Clock now stands at 2 ½ minutes to midnight, the closest it has been since the 1950s.

The clock is a visual representation of how close the Bulletin believes the world is to catastrophe brought on by nuclear weapons, climate change and new technologies.

Must Read

Earth sets hottest year record for third-straight time,

Jan 18, 2017

Scientists say the Earth sizzled to a third-straight heat record last year

Diversity in tech: Lots of attention, little progress

Jan 24, 2017

Despite loudly touted efforts, the tech industry is making very little progress in diversifying its workforce, especially in technical and leadership positions

Instead of chasing storms, ice researchers create their own

Jan 25, 2017

Researchers at an experimental forest in New Hampshire are conjuring up ice storms in hopes of better understanding how they affect an ecosystem

Kick Connect publishes a comprehensive overview of the latest news and theories on science & technology. We also report accurate news with a unique perspective on the world around us.

Contact us: sales@kickconnect.com