Study: Climate change making Europe heatwaves more likely

Traffic queue for the Eurotunnel in Folkestone, south east England, Friday July 27, 2018. Britain sweltered through the hottest day of the year Thursday, as an unusual heatwave wreaked havoc on transport and hospitals. The Cross-Channel rail operator cancelled thousands of tickets after "extreme temperatures" caused major disruption to services. (Gareth Fuller/PA via AP)
People enjoy the Bournemouth beach in Dorset, England, as the hot weather continues across Britain. Britain is experiencing a severe heatwave which has prompted its national weather service to issue an alert for people to 'stay out of the sun'. (Andrew Matthews/PA via AP)
A view shows parched grass from the lack of rain in Greenwich Park, backdropped by the Royal Museums Greenwich and the skyscrapers of the Canary Wharf business district, during what has been the driest summer for many years in London, Tuesday, July 24, 2018. Britain is experiencing a severe heatwave which has prompted its national weather service to issue an alert for people to 'stay out of the sun'. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
A view from Primrose Hill shows parched grass from the lack of rain during what has been the driest summer for many years in London, Wednesday, July 25, 2018. Britain is experiencing a severe heatwave which has prompted its national weather service to issue an alert for people to 'stay out of the sun'. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
A view shows parched grass from the lack of rain in Greenwich Park, backdropped by the Royal Museums Greenwich and the skyscrapers of the Canary Wharf business district, during what has been the driest summer for many years in London, Tuesday, July 24, 2018. Britain is experiencing a severe heatwave which has prompted its national weather service to issue an alert for people to 'stay out of the sun'. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

BERLIN — Researchers say heatwaves of the kind currently being seen in northern Europe have become twice as likely due to climate change.

Scientists from the World Weather Attribution team said Friday they have compared observations and forecasts for the Netherlands, Denmark and Ireland with historical records going back to the early 1900s. They concluded the likelihood of three-day stretches of extreme heat in those areas has increased at least two-fold.

The group, which works to determine if there's a link between weather phenomena and climate change, said current temperatures further north are so unusual there's not enough data to predict their future likelihood.

Erich Fischer, an expert on weather extremes at ETH Zurich in Switzerland who was not involved with the study, said the authors use well-established methodology and "their estimates may even be rather conservative."

Must Read

Flabby heart keeps pumping with squeeze from robotic sleeve

Jan 18, 2017

Scientists are developing a robotic sleeve that can encase a flabby diseased heart and gently squeeze to keep it pumping

Energy pick vows to boost agency he had pledged to eliminate

Jan 19, 2017

Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry, tapped by President-elect Donald Trump to head the Energy Department, vowed to be an advocate for an agency he once pledged to eliminate and promised to rely on federal scientists, including those who work on climate change

Official: Trump wants to slash EPA workforce, budget

Jan 26, 2017

The former head of President Donald Trump's transition team at the Environmental Protection Agency says he expects the new administration to seek significant budget and staff cuts

Kick Connect publishes a comprehensive overview of the latest news and theories on science & technology. We also report accurate news with a unique perspective on the world around us.

Contact us: sales@kickconnect.com